Tag: intern

This week I have experienced a combination of feelings after deciding to continue my time at Sarvodaya as a full-time intern: gratitude, tranquility and excited anticipation.

(Background, and how I’ve arrived in California with interests in farming)

I’ve taken what feels like a 180 degree life transition over the course of the past year. A year ago my future seemed set in stone to work as a full-time musician and “artist” (a word set aside for a select few?). I have been afforded the luxury of time to step aside from this focus. Something felt unfulfilling about the prospect of spending my time largely indoors (an apartment writing and recording). I went home to Vermont after studying music in Boston to “unpack” myself (subconsciously at first) and find a different way. I was raised in Vermont, and love everything about the place. There is a strong sense of community and support for the arts, as well as seasonal variety to enjoy. I have continued to develop my relationship with music since a young age, and recognize how crucial it is to maintain a loving relationship with music and myself as a maker-of-sounds. This “commercial artist path” strained my self-love and self-security. I felt external pressure to become popular, or successful, or some multitude of dreams that had never been my own. I now understand that I was missing the connected experience of putting my hands in the soil (not dirt!) and closing the food loop; growing my own food.

In fairly recent history, the role (or perceptive role) of the artist has changed in society. The artist was once a member of society, rather than a talent we put on a pedestal and quarantined out. So, if art voices the experience, then it would only make sense that the artist be a part of the society it expresses. What do we get when the art is a reflection of itself? For example, the musician who now only knows life on tour and ducking paparazzi.
I would like to be an artist who knows their community, and is able to express a wider range of voices, especially for those who are unable to show their grief, joy, etc. Once I am well-versed in farm practices, I will start farms in my community that provide as a food bank does. Access to an education about food is essential to human wellness. Sarvodaya is in many ways a model of what I would like to start. I am immensely grateful to work with this family of farmers and farmers-to-be. I love the way Rishi, Manju, Katie, and Lynn teach. They will tell you everything they’ve learned, and are forthright that they too are still learning. I find this approach empowering to continue seeking.

There is indeed a lifetime of learning ahead. In California, water seems to be our greatest limitation; but it is by no means a setback. At this point I am also interested in learning how to design and integrate food forest systems that are drought tolerant, despite their inability to provide the foods we have become accustomed to. I sense it is inevitable that we will have to make adjustments in the future. One thing I have been noticing and thinking about since working on the farm are the standards of blemish-free produce that grocery stores and genetically modified varieties have created. I hope that people will become closer to the growing processes and realize that blemishes and abnormalities are normal in any form of life. In the meantime, I will enjoy the food that doesn’t meet the CSA standards!

Farm day.

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Cecile waters the nursery – a part of farm chores.

 

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A beautiful smile despite the cold.

 

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Cindy and Susan collect eggs from the coops.

 

A chicken in mid-flight.

A chicken in mid-flight.

 

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Teamwork.

Teamwork.

 

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Cindy a farm intern attempts to pet the chickens.

 

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Mint never dies.

Mint never dies.

 

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Farm meditation.

 

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Water break.

Water break.

 

An immature Chinese long bean continues to grow.

An immature Chinese long bean continues to grow.

 

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Preparing boxes

Preparing boxes.

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A bird feather found in the field.

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A DAY IN THE LIFE OF THE FARM.
Sometimes, the best way to experience the farm, is through images.

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Cat’s scamper to the back, waiting for their morning meal.

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A chicken contemplates the next pond leaf it will nibble on.

 

Cecile (an intern) works to fill the water in the chicken coop.

Cecile (an intern) works to fill the water in the chicken coop.

 

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Chickens look for grubs in the ground.

 

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Bees collect pollen from corn tassels and store them in sacks on their legs.

 

A new bed is planted, and covered with burlap for protection.

A new bed is planted, and covered with burlap for protection.

 

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Katie harvests bush beans.

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Field sign painted by intern Faye.

Field sign painted by intern Faye.

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An intern shows off a colorful insect she found in the field.

 

Radish sprouts

Radish seedlings. 

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Farmer Rishi instructs Cecile (an intern) on planting practices.

Farmer Rishi instructs Cecile (an intern) on planting practices.

 

Freshly harvested pomegranates.

Freshly harvested pomegranates.

 

Kelsey (an intern) fixes a drip line.

Kelsey (an intern) fixes a drip line.

 

Moringa leaves and flowers.

Moringa leaves and flowers.

 

Farmer Manju works hard packaging produce.

Farmer Manju works hard packaging amaranth.

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The hat wall.

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Cindy spreads diatomaceous earth, the fossilized remains of marine phytoplankton, to keep invasive insects at bay.

Cindy spreads diatomaceous earth, the fossilized remains of marine phytoplankton, to keep invasive insects at bay.

 

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