Farmers in Training Journal

<p style=”padding:10px;”>Journal entries below are from Interns in our Farmer Training Program. These entries are mean to provide insight into the world of farming from the view of newcomers, and serve as an educational resource for our community. We hope you enjoy these journal entries as much as our interns enjoy their time on the farm! </p>

Latest Posts

  • sterility – Iris Xu – Entry 04 One of the biggest contrasts that has struck me while at the farm is the difference in what “healthy” means, the fertility and abundance of the farm versus the sterility of our general society. It’s driven home for me how central sterility is in this country and the role it plays in our capitalist, single-use ...
  • Food Thought Splattering: Take 1, An Introduction This week I have experienced a combination of feelings after deciding to continue my time at Sarvodaya as a full-time intern: gratitude, tranquility and excited anticipation. (Background, and how I’ve arrived in California with interests in farming) I’ve taken what feels like a 180 degree life transition over the course of the past year. A year ago ...
  • Returning to the Source – Will Floyd – Entry 09 As I prune the plant, I prune myself The withered and old, the decayed and dessicated It remains without attention   The whole will survive, but not thrive I hang on to it, it does not wish to die Nor I But I am already dead, for I was never born There is nothing to fear   Let go of the rot, it is not ...
  • Beetles, Beetles, Everywhere! – Will Floyd – Entry 08 If someone visits Sarvodaya these days, they will probably notice a peculiar new creature calling the farm home. Large swarms of big, iridescent green June beetles (aka the figeater beetle, Cotinus mutabilis) have dominated the air space around the crops. These things are incredibly clumsy, flying into fences, plants, and other objects, quite frequently smacking you ...
  • Life, Death, and Food — Kimberly Kirner — Entry 6 "Field A" sign and California native plantsTwo gophers have been trapped and died since I arrived at the farm.  They’re terrifically destructive little beasts.  One of them took out 15 tomato plants before he succumbed to his love of peanut butter, smeared on a trap.  I have uncomfortable, mixed feelings about this. Food is the result of a cycle of life and ...
See All Journal Entries