Category: Weekly Farm Update

Farm Update

Hello Growing Club Members & CSA members!

Raindrops fall as blessings from the sky, and we stand in awe as fields of fertile soil become bounteous with the blessings of our mother Earth. This week our prayers of longing were answered and answered sternly. I watched from my bed as the rain hammered down on the rich ground of our home, and as the sky finished each sentence with a flash of light and a roar of thunder. Our mother is so beautiful in her most angry and terrifying moments. I counted the lightning bolts as the clock ticked from 3am to 4, from 4am to 5, thankful that the dry season’s reign was ending for the year. All hail the glorious broccoli, she rises up from her hot slumber, ready to fill bellies and delight tastebuds.

Due to the strong rain, we closed the farm on Monday. We like to give the earth some time after strong rains like what we had to adjust to the dramatic change before we dig into her with our manipulations and goals. This morning I came to the farm, hoping to see a resurgence of growth from the beautifully oxygenated, alchemical power of rainwater and I was not disappointed. All the residents of the farm were standing up tall, singing the praises of the sky and the clouds and the wind as much as us.  Our trainees got straight to it, now that they’ve become somewhat accustomed to the motions and rhythms of the farm. Babies in the nursery were watered and fed, chickens let out to scavenge the earth for grubs and worms, and the weekly harvest began in earnest. This season is the one we wait for each year. No sweat dripping from our brows, no over-eager plants to trellis, just easy picking close to the soil. Eat your fill friends. Let your desires be fulfilled by the daikon radish, be mesmerized by the chioggia beet, and pickle every carrot you see.

Until next week,

Farmer Rishi
Founder/Director, The Growing Club

Photos of the Week

The chickens are enjoying their fresh wheat grass, which they are now getting daily.

The chickens are enjoying their fresh wheat grass, which they are now getting daily.

Our daikon radishes are sizing up! Lynn harvests baby daikon for the CSA.

Our daikon radishes are sizing up! Lynn harvests baby daikon for the CSA.

Cecile harvests the swiss chard that is growing so majestically.

Cecile harvests the swiss chard that is growing so majestically.

This week’s CSA Box

(Please click each item below for a larger photo, description, and preparation instructions.)

NOTE: We are trying to get around to update vegetables descriptions. In the mean time, for items without a provided description, feel free to Google uses and recipes.

Large Box

Vegetables:
– Zucchinno Rampicante or Zucchinni
– 1 bag eggplant and cucumber
– 1 bunch amaranth
– 1 bunch yard long beans
– 1 bunch swiss chard
– 1 box Sarvodaya salad mix (arugula, lettuce, swiss chard, radish)
butternut squash & corn
– baby daikon radish (the whole thing is edible, roots and leaves – big daikon coming next week)
moringa pod

Herbs:
– 1 bunch basil
– 1 bunch garlic chives*

Fruit:
– 1 box VERY RIPE white sapote
(If you’ve never had sapote before you are in for a treat. Just eat all the flesh and skin, don’t eat the seed. It is a little messy.)
– 1 box jamun and mixed guava

Small Box

Vegetables:
– Zucchinno Rampicante or Zucchinni
– 1 bunch amaranth
– 1 bunch yard long beans
– 1 box Sarvodaya salad mix (arugula, lettuce, swiss chard, radish)
butternut squash & corn
moringa pod
– 1 box Sarvodaya stir fry mix

Herbs:
– 1 bunch basil

Fruit:
– 1 box VERY RIPE white sapote
(If you’ve never had sapote before you are in for a treat. Just eat all the flesh and skin, don’t eat the seed. It is a little messy.)
– 1 box jamun and mixed guava

Storage Instructions

Leafy Vegetables
In case your greens are wilted by the time you pickup your box, please follow these instructions:

– Fill a small bowl or tub with 1 inch of water
– Cut a 1/2 inch of the bottoms of the stems of your leafy greens
– Place greens, with stems down, into the bowl of water
– Leave the greens in the bowl overnight and by morning they should be rehydrated

Wrap your rehydrated greens in a towel and store the in the fridge. Summer greens like water spinach, moringa, and yam leaves don’t last long either way, so eat those as soon as you can.

Herbs
The best way to store your herbs so that they keep longer is to cut the stems a little and place them in a glass filled with about an inch of water. Cover the leaves loosely with a bag and keep them in the refrigerator. Replace the water inside when it gets cloudy. This works great with basil, mint, cilantro, parsley, and many other herbs.

Please feel free to share your recipes with us and also any storing tips you may have. 🙂

Farm Update

Hello Growing Club Members & CSA members!

The sun is getting lazy as we move into the winter season. Each day we wake up to find the darkness has come earlier, but we still get dressed, pack our pruners and breakfast, and head to the farm. There is an unspeakable beauty to our abundant farm in the fog of the fall. Not just in the lush plants, and the swaying trees, and the haze that makes each leaf glisten, but in the morning shivers we share as we move to find feeling in our hands and in the soft clouds of our frozen breaths. To stand in awe in all of the beauty that surrounds us, and think back to just two years ago when none of it all existed, when it was just a dream we hadn’t fully thought out, makes me so grateful for the world’s willingness to change. The soil doesn’t fight back when you spread compost on it, refusing to accept the blessing. The earth sings when we spread our mulch, dancing at the sight of a insulating blanket. The butterflies don’t refuse to migrate in when you plant flowers for their pleasure, they call in their friends. The creation of a garden in our saddened urban lands is truly a blessing for everyone. Thank you all for being a part of this adventure which challenges the basic tenets of our increasingly structured, organized, chaotic world. Wishing you all a beautiful fall and happy tummy.

Until next week,

Farmer Rishi
Founder/Director, The Growing Club

Photos of the Week

This week I’m happy to share some beautiful photos from one of our new Farmer Trainees, Krysta. Krysta has a blog where she writes about food, farming, cooking, and more. Check it out here! And enjoy her photos below.

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Cindy and Cammi happily picking through the eggplant bed.

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The team sets up a sprinkler line to germinate a bed of carrots.

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Farmer Katie picks through a bed of bush beans.

This week’s CSA Box

(Please click each item below for a larger photo, description, and preparation instructions.)

NOTE: We are trying to get around to update vegetables descriptions. In the mean time, for items without a provided description, feel free to Google uses and recipes.

Vegetables:
– 2 pieces mixed summer squash (zucchino rampicante or zucchinni or young butternut)
– 1 large or 2 small ears sweet corn
– 1 bunch amaranth
– 1 bunch yard long beans*
– 1 bag mixed salad greens with radish
– 1 bunch young swiss chard**
– 1 bunch water spinach*
– 1 bunch moringa leaf & 1 bunch moringa seed pod*
– 1 basket jalapenos

Herbs:
– 1 bunch lemongrass*
– 1 bunch basil*
– 1 bunch garlic chives**

Fruit:
– 1 bag guavas
– 1 basket jamun*
– 1 lb pomegranate*

*LARGE VEGGIE BOX ONLY
**SMALL VEGGIE BOX ONLY

Storage Instructions

Leafy Vegetables
In case your greens are wilted by the time you pickup your box, please follow these instructions:

– Fill a small bowl or tub with 1 inch of water
– Cut a 1/2 inch of the bottoms of the stems of your leafy greens
– Place greens, with stems down, into the bowl of water
– Leave the greens in the bowl overnight and by morning they should be rehydrated

Wrap your rehydrated greens in a towel and store the in the fridge. Summer greens like water spinach, moringa, and yam leaves don’t last long either way, so eat those as soon as you can.

Herbs
The best way to store your herbs so that they keep longer is to cut the stems a little and place them in a glass filled with about an inch of water. Cover the leaves loosely with a bag and keep them in the refrigerator. Replace the water inside when it gets cloudy. This works great with basil, mint, cilantro, parsley, and many other herbs.

Please feel free to share your recipes with us and also any storing tips you may have. 🙂

Farm Update

Hello Growing Club Members & CSA members!

Today the weather decided to be winter. It seems like more and more seasons are not patterns of weather that last for several months, but instead are daily or weekly occurrences. Today and tomorrow are winter, but three days from now might be summer or spring. As a farmer, I find this new pattern very worrying, because it makes planning on the farm very difficult. Last week, we transplanted a 150 or so red russian kale plants on a cool day, expecting cooler weather to follow. Instead, the weather shifted to 90+ degrees and we lost about a 1/3 of those plants. Thankfully, we still have enough to fill all our CSA members boxes, but I am a bit worried for the future.

On the brighter side, today saw the debut of the farm’s first root vegetables of the fall, with baby daikon radish coming out of the ground and into all of our small boxes. The baby daikon whole plants can be eaten in their entirety and they have a pleasant, mildly spicy flavor that will go great in warming soups and stir fries. You can also pickle the daikon leaves by massaging them with salt and putting them in jars like sauerkraut. Large boxes got the first of the sweet corn harvest (only a few ears were ready this week), which is coming along beautifully.

Our new class of Farmer Trainees seems to be settling in comfortably into the farm’s rhythms. We have developed a number of new systems for them to make learning on the farm easier and clearer, and we are working through our grant from Tri-City Mental Health to further develop our curriculum for them. I know they are enjoying growing, caring for and harvesting the food we all eat, and I am thankful to have such a great group with us.

Until next week,

Farmer Rishi
Founder/Director, The Growing Club

Photos of the Week

Lynn's beautiful compost makes the farm go round. This pile was just finishing up.

Lynn’s beautiful compost makes the farm go round. This pile was just finishing up.

Brooke harvests the beautiful wall of yard long beans.

Brooke harvests the beautiful wall of yard long beans.

Cecile with a box full of baby swiss chard.

Cecile with a box full of baby swiss chard.

Farmer Trainee Journal Entries

Want to see the farm through the eyes of our Farmer Trainees? Read their weekly blog posts below.

This week’s CSA Box

(Please click each item below for a larger photo, description, and preparation instructions.)

NOTE: We are trying to get around to update vegetables descriptions. In the mean time, for items without a provided description, feel free to Google uses and recipes.

Vegetables:
– 1 Zucchino Rampicante
– 1 bunch amaranth
– 1 bunch yard long beans
– 1 bag baby sautee mix (napa cabbage, beet greens, swiss chard)
– 1 bag mixed salad greens*
– 1 bunch water spinach*
– 1 box nopales
– 1 bunch baby daikon (eat the root and leaves!)

Herbs:
– 1 bunch lemongrass
– 1 bunch basil*

Fruit:
– 1 box jamun
– many guavas*
– 1 lb pomegranate**

*LARGE VEGGIE BOX ONLY
**SMALL VEGGIE BOX ONLY

Storage Instructions

Leafy Vegetables
In case your greens are wilted by the time you pickup your box, please follow these instructions:

– Fill a small bowl or tub with 1 inch of water
– Cut a 1/2 inch of the bottoms of the stems of your leafy greens
– Place greens, with stems down, into the bowl of water
– Leave the greens in the bowl overnight and by morning they should be rehydrated

Wrap your rehydrated greens in a towel and store the in the fridge. Summer greens like water spinach, moringa, and yam leaves don’t last long either way, so eat those as soon as you can.

Herbs
The best way to store your herbs so that they keep longer is to cut the stems a little and place them in a glass filled with about an inch of water. Cover the leaves loosely with a bag and keep them in the refrigerator. Replace the water inside when it gets cloudy. This works great with basil, mint, cilantro, parsley, and many other herbs.

Please feel free to share your recipes with us and also any storing tips you may have. 🙂

Farm Update

Hello Growing Club Members & CSA members!

Okay, so we got to it a bit late, but we did IT! We successfully grew sweet corn this year and harvested our first ear! They will be going into CSA boxes next week, and hopefully the week after also. Organic sweet corn is very hard to find because many times little caterpillars end up in the ears eating the kernels. Conventional farmers spray pesticides to kill off this caterpillar, but of course we did no such thing. So yes, your ear of corn may come with a worm or two. Just pick it off and enjoy the corn. The corn we grew is an open-pollinated variety called “Who Gets Kissed?” that was developed specifically for small-scale organic growers like us. It has done great in our fields, and we are so happy that we can actually SAVE THE SEED and grow it again next year. Doesn’t get much better than that.

Today, our new Farmer Trainee class met for their first sit-down class session and we discussed the main ideas behind our farm, specifically viewing the farm as a whole, functioning ecosystem where each element is intimately connected to and affecting every other element. During the class I realized how different our training is from the type of schooling I grew up with. Trying to understand a whole system, and all the connections between the elements of a system is contrary to anything anyone learns in school (unless maybe they attend a Montessori or Waldorf type school). When your mind has been trained to reduce, zoom-in and concentrate for years and years, it really is difficult to backup and see the whole picture (which is a scary picture to see today). Although we call our program a “farmer training,” my secret goal is actually to trick people into seeing the world as an ocean of connection. Only then can we see and understand structural problems and come up with effective solutions, whether it is in the fields of our farms, the classrooms of our schools, or the halls of government.

Until next week,

Farmer Rishi
Founder/Director, The Growing Club

Photos of the Week

Our first ear of sweet corn. Coming in the CSA next week!

Our first ear of sweet corn. Coming in the CSA next week!

Ingrid and Brooke working on the harvest this morning.

Ingrid and Brooke working on the harvest this morning.

Happy cabbage seedlings growing in the nursery.

Happy cabbage seedlings growing in the nursery.

Farmer Trainee Journal Entries

Want to see the farm through the eyes of our Farmer Trainees? Read their weekly blog posts below.

This week’s CSA Box

(Please click each item below for a larger photo, description, and preparation instructions.)

NOTE: We are trying to get around to update vegetables descriptions. In the mean time, for items without a provided description, feel free to Google uses and recipes.

Vegetables:
– 1 Zucchino Rampicante or Zucchini or butternut squash
– 1 bag eggplant
– 1 bunch amaranth
– 1 bunch yard long beans**
– 1 bunch bush beans*
– 1 box baby swiss chard
– 1 box mixed salad greens*
– 1 bunch water spinach*
– 1 bunch moringa pods + moringa leaves

Herbs:
– 1 bunch parsley*
– 1 bunch basil

Fruit:
– 1 box jamun
– a couple guavas
– 1 lb pomegranate*

*LARGE VEGGIE BOX ONLY
**SMALL VEGGIE BOX ONLY

Storage Instructions

Leafy Vegetables
In case your greens are wilted by the time you pickup your box, please follow these instructions:

– Fill a small bowl or tub with 1 inch of water
– Cut a 1/2 inch of the bottoms of the stems of your leafy greens
– Place greens, with stems down, into the bowl of water
– Leave the greens in the bowl overnight and by morning they should be rehydrated

Wrap your rehydrated greens in a towel and store the in the fridge. Summer greens like water spinach, moringa, and yam leaves don’t last long either way, so eat those as soon as you can.

Herbs
The best way to store your herbs so that they keep longer is to cut the stems a little and place them in a glass filled with about an inch of water. Cover the leaves loosely with a bag and keep them in the refrigerator. Replace the water inside when it gets cloudy. This works great with basil, mint, cilantro, parsley, and many other herbs.

Please feel free to share your recipes with us and also any storing tips you may have. 🙂

Farm Update

Hello Growing Club Members & CSA members!

This week I feel like I’ve finally been able to settle back into the farming routine after being distracted by the home renovations for several weeks. There are still some renovations going on, but I have been able to catch up on a lot of farm work and bring my focus back to the our farmer trainees and the plant beings in the fields. Our new class of farmer trainees is being trained by the outgoing class, many of whom will finish their time on the farm this week. Although many of the trainees in our graduating class came in with very limited gardening experience, we have seem these trainees grow over the past 4 months, and I am confident that they have gained a strong footing in gardening to guide them in their future projects. Our new class is starting off to on a good foot as well. We’ve made a number of adjustments to the program for this session, and will be introducing much more structure to the training program with this class, including a stronger curriculum along with research assignments, prepared handouts, and guest teachers. We are hoping these additions will bring more focus to the program and create a more enriching experience.

In the field, this week has a been a struggle. I’m realizing more and more how dangerous the increasingly unstable weather is. Last Friday, we transplanted several hundred starts of pac choi, yukina, and kale into fields, expecting the temperature to stay cooler at least for a few days. The 100 degree+ weather over the weekend literally killed those plans, and we lost about 40% of those transplants. Not fun. I see more of a detrimental effect when the weather is cool at night and swings to a scorch by midday. The plants (and the farmers) seem to perform the worse during these temperature swings. Weeks like this really frighten me because I understand how fragile our entire agricultural system is. We are able to withstand these swings much better than others since our soil is so rich, but industrial farms won’t be able to respond these beatings well. Hopefully the weather stabilizes a bit as we move into winter and we can usher forth the bountiful greens of winter better.

CSA members will notice these weather fluctuations in the boxes, as we rely on sturdier plants such as nopales, moringa, yam leaves, and amaranth for the remainder of the “famine” season. Thankfully, we have such diversity to draw on during these more difficult times.

Until next week,

Farmer Rishi
Founder/Director, The Growing Club

Photos of the Week

This week I thought I’d share some photos of the gardens at The Growing Home. Though the spotlight has moved away from our original ecological garden, it remains a dynamic and beautiful space that we are so happy to call home.

Ingrid and the watering team make sure the seedlings are germinating.

Ingrid and the watering team make sure the seedlings are germinating.

Picking bush beans that have been so prolific recently

Picking bush beans that have been so prolific recently

Playing hide and seek in the yard long beans. Look at that beautiful trellis!

Playing hide and seek in the yard long beans. Look at that beautiful trellis!

Farmer Trainee Journal Entries

Want to see the farm through the eyes of our Farmer Trainees? Read their weekly blog posts below.

This week’s CSA Box

(Please click each item below for a larger photo, description, and preparation instructions.)

NOTE: We are trying to get around to update vegetables descriptions. In the mean time, for items without a provided description, feel free to Google uses and recipes.

Vegetables:
– 1 Zucchino Rampicante or Zucchini or butternut squash
– 1 bag eggplant
– 1 bunch amaranth
– 1 bunch yard long beans
– 1 bunch bush beans
– 1 box baby swiss chard*
– 1 bunch water spinach*
– 1 bunch moringa pods + moringa flowers*
– 1 bunch yam leaves**

Herbs:
– 1 bunch mint
– 1 bunch garlic chives*

Fruit:
– 1.5 lbs pomegranate **
– 3 lbs pomegranate *

*LARGE VEGGIE BOX ONLY
**SMALL VEGGIE BOX ONLY

Storage Instructions

Leafy Vegetables
In case your greens are wilted by the time you pickup your box, please follow these instructions:

– Fill a small bowl or tub with 1 inch of water
– Cut a 1/2 inch of the bottoms of the stems of your leafy greens
– Place greens, with stems down, into the bowl of water
– Leave the greens in the bowl overnight and by morning they should be rehydrated

Wrap your rehydrated greens in a towel and store the in the fridge. Summer greens like water spinach, moringa, and yam leaves don’t last long either way, so eat those as soon as you can.

Herbs
The best way to store your herbs so that they keep longer is to cut the stems a little and place them in a glass filled with about an inch of water. Cover the leaves loosely with a bag and keep them in the refrigerator. Replace the water inside when it gets cloudy. This works great with basil, mint, cilantro, parsley, and many other herbs.

Please feel free to share your recipes with us and also any storing tips you may have. 🙂

Farm Update

Hello Growing Club Members & CSA members!

The last few weeks have been quite a whirlwind, but now I can see that the storm is starting to settle. The farmhouse restoration is coming to an end, with just a few projects left to be completed. Our summer class of the Farmer Training Program is now coming to a close, with most of the interns finishing up their required days in the next week or two. This week our new class of Farmer Trainees has begun, and we have another wonderful class of farmers-to-be. This class is another all-female cast, and Cindy, Susan, Krysta, Brooke, and Cecile all started working together on the farm this past Monday. We immediately got their hands in the ground planting new starts, seeding plugs in the nursery, harvesting, turning over beds, and managing the chickens. Their is a lot to learn at the farm, especially now that we have a number of systems in place to keep the farm running smoothly. I’m sure our trainees are up for the task. As for the fields themselves, we are moving further and further into the cool season, with tall, aspirational plants like tomatoes, cucumbers, and beans making their final appearances for the year, and ground-hugging, dew loving plants like broccoli, kale, bok choi, komatsuna, mizuna, and lettuce taking root in their place. With a little luck and some cooperation from the weather spirits, we’ll have a very abundant fall and winter season, just like we did last year. The beauty of fields full of green, happy vegetables in the fall is always a blessing to behold and we’re all looking forward to the weather cooling down after so many months of heat. It will be a great time to visit the farm once this wave of heat passes, so I hope to see many of you who have never been by to the farm sometime soon!

Until next week,

Farmer Rishi
Founder/Director, The Growing Club

Farmer Trainee Journal Entries

Want to see the farm through the eyes of our Farmer Trainees? Read their weekly blog posts below.

Farmer Trainee Journals will be back next week with our new Farmer Training Class!

This week’s CSA Box

(Please click each item below for a larger photo, description, and preparation instructions.)

NOTE: We are trying to get around to update vegetables descriptions. In the mean time, for items without a provided description, feel free to Google uses and recipes.

Vegetables:
– 1 zuchinno rampicante
– 1 bag eggplant
– 1 bunch amaranth
– 1 bunch yard long beans*
– 1 bag green and purple snap beans
– 1 basket sweet peppers + jalapenos*
– 1 bunch yam leaves*
– 1 bunch Egyptian green onions*
– 1 bunch water spinach **
– 1 bunch moringa greens + moringa pods **

Herbs:
– 1 bunch basil
– 1 bundle lemongrass *

Fruit:
– 1 lb mixed stone fruit*
– .5 lb jujube from The Growing Home

*LARGE VEGGIE BOX ONLY
**SMALL VEGGIE BOX ONLY

Storage Instructions

Leafy Vegetables
In case your greens are wilted by the time you pickup your box, please follow these instructions:

– Fill a small bowl or tub with 1 inch of water
– Cut a 1/2 inch of the bottoms of the stems of your leafy greens
– Place greens, with stems down, into the bowl of water
– Leave the greens in the bowl overnight and by morning they should be rehydrated

Wrap your rehydrated greens in a towel and store the in the fridge. Summer greens like water spinach, moringa, and yam leaves don’t last long either way, so eat those as soon as you can.

Herbs
The best way to store your herbs so that they keep longer is to cut the stems a little and place them in a glass filled with about an inch of water. Cover the leaves loosely with a bag and keep them in the refrigerator. Replace the water inside when it gets cloudy. This works great with basil, mint, cilantro, parsley, and many other herbs.

Please feel free to share your recipes with us and also any storing tips you may have. 🙂

Farm Update

Hello Growing Club Members & CSA members!

 

It has been another extremely full week for us at the farm and especially the farmhouse.  We have made tremendous progress with the farmhouse which, with the help and guidance of our friend and Club Member Russ, is looking so beautiful. Russ flew down from Seattle and has been staying with us the last three weeks to help whip this house into shape, and he has done an incredible job of transforming it into a warm home for us. We are so grateful for his willingness to bring forth this dream with us.  As for the farm, it is chugging along even with our attention diverted mostly to the home. The weather is transitioning us to more fall crops, which means lots of greens and root vegetables. We are excited for the rest of the cooler temperatures, as we are weary of the heat the constant work of summer at the farm. Hope you all are enjoying your week and will enjoy this week’s bounty.

Until next week,

Farmer Rishi
Founder/Director, The Growing Club

Farmer Trainee Journal Entries

Want to see the farm through the eyes of our Farmer Trainees? Read their weekly blog posts below.

 

This week’s CSA Box

(Please click each item below for a larger photo, description, and preparation instructions.)

NOTE: We are trying to get around to update vegetables descriptions. In the mean time, for items without a provided description, feel free to Google uses and recipes.

Vegetables:
– 1 zuchinno rampicante
– 1 bag nopales (cactus pads)*
– 1 bag long sweet peppers + a few jalapenos*
– 2-3 eggplant*
– 1 bunch yam leaf
– 1 bunch sorrel*
– 1 bunch yard long beans
– 1 bunch water spinach*
– 1 bunch moringa **
– 1 bag bell peppers **
– 1 bunch amaranth**

Herbs:
– 1 bunch mint*
– 1 bunch basil

Fruit:
– 1 lb mixed stone fruit
– 1 lb Growing Home mango*

*LARGE VEGGIE BOX ONLY
**SMALL VEGGIE BOX ONLY

Storage Instructions

Leafy Vegetables
In case your greens are wilted by the time you pickup your box, please follow these instructions:

– Fill a small bowl or tub with 1 inch of water
– Cut a 1/2 inch of the bottoms of the stems of your leafy greens
– Place greens, with stems down, into the bowl of water
– Leave the greens in the bowl overnight and by morning they should be rehydrated

Wrap your rehydrated greens in a towel and store the in the fridge. Summer greens like water spinach, moringa, and yam leaves don’t last long either way, so eat those as soon as you can.

Herbs
The best way to store your herbs so that they keep longer is to cut the stems a little and place them in a glass filled with about an inch of water. Cover the leaves loosely with a bag and keep them in the refrigerator. Replace the water inside when it gets cloudy. This works great with basil, mint, cilantro, parsley, and many other herbs.

Please feel free to share your recipes with us and also any storing tips you may have. 🙂

Farm Update

Hello Growing Club Members & CSA members!

As you have probably noticed, I have been unable to get these weekly posts out to you for the past three weeks. We have been so busy working on the remodeling of the farmhouse that I’ve had to let a few of my obligations slide. This weeks’ post will be brief as well. I plan to return to writing these weekly updates once the renovation is complete and I have the time to do them. I hope you are all still enjoying our produce and we thank you for your continued support.

An additional note: We have reached the point of the year which I call the “famine season.” After so many months of summer, the soil is tired, the plants are tired, and we are tired. You may notice your box of produce is a little lighter in the next few weeks as the famine season peaks. You can expect boxes to return to a hefty size once the weather cools a bit and we can move into our fall and winter vegetable crops.

Until next week,

Farmer Rishi
Founder/Director, The Growing Club

Farmer Trainee Journal Entries

Want to see the farm through the eyes of our Farmer Trainees? Read their weekly blog posts below.

This week’s Journal Excerpt comes from Farmer Trainee Haleemah:

As a recent champion against lung cancer (I didn’t just survive it, I beat it), the most revolutionary and proactive thing I can do is drop seeds in the ground, grow my own food, and help others to do the same. You see, my experience at Sarvodaya has proven that farming is not such a departure after all. Farming is an act of social and economic justice. Food is absolutely a quality of life issue. The environment is a quality of life issue. The natural world is under attack and over- commodified, as it is common place to purchase water, seeds, and dirt.

This week’s CSA Box

(Please click each item below for a larger photo, description, and preparation instructions.)

NOTE: We are trying to get around to update vegetables descriptions. In the mean time, for items without a provided description, feel free to Google uses and recipes.

Vegetables:
– 1 rampicante squash
– 1 bunch yam leaves
– 1 bunch amaranth
– 1 bunch moringa greens and moringa pods*
– 1 bag mixed sweet peppers
– 1 bag eggplant
– 1 bag organic mixed salad greens ** (from Sage Mountain Farm)

Herbs:
– 1 bunch garlic chives
– 1 bunch garlic chive flowers
– 1 bunch italian basil*

Fruit:
– 1 lb mixed stone fruit
– 1 bag of jujubes and a Growing Home mango *

*LARGE VEGGIE BOX ONLY
**SMALL VEGGIE BOX ONLY

Storage Instructions

Leafy Vegetables
In case your greens are wilted by the time you pickup your box, please follow these instructions:

– Fill a small bowl or tub with 1 inch of water
– Cut a 1/2 inch of the bottoms of the stems of your leafy greens
– Place greens, with stems down, into the bowl of water
– Leave the greens in the bowl overnight and by morning they should be rehydrated

Wrap your rehydrated greens in a towel and store the in the fridge. Summer greens like water spinach, moringa, and yam leaves don’t last long either way, so eat those as soon as you can.

Herbs
The best way to store your herbs so that they keep longer is to cut the stems a little and place them in a glass filled with about an inch of water. Cover the leaves loosely with a bag and keep them in the refrigerator. Replace the water inside when it gets cloudy. This works great with basil, mint, cilantro, parsley, and many other herbs.

Please feel free to share your recipes with us and also any storing tips you may have. 🙂

Farm Update

Hello Growing Club Members & CSA members!

Last Friday, I walked the fields to see which beds still need to be planted and which beds weren’t doing well. For the first time in two years, I came back to the front of the farm with a very meager task list for our Farmer Trainees. To be sure, there was plenty of work we could do, but this was the first time every bed was absolutely full, with beautiful growth coming from almost every inch of our beds. That feeling of satisfaction was immense, not just because it meant that the farm is full of healthy food for our community, but also because it meant that our Farmer Trainees were really getting the hang of this whole farming gig.  Our current trainee class is now coming into their 3rd month, and many of them are showing promise as urban farm extraordinaires.  Now that we will have free reign to do the farm up to its full potential, its exciting to think about the future possibilities of this little farm that could and I can barely hold that excitement in.

P.S. WE ARE GOING TO PLANT SOOOOOO MANY FRUIT TREES! OMGAWSH DELICIOUSNESS!

Until next week,

Farmer Rishi
Founder/Director, The Growing Club

Photos of the Week

Chickens enjoying fresh water and water hyacinth from our mini pond.

Chickens enjoying fresh water and water hyacinth from our mini pond.

Our farm shining in the peak of summer.

Our farm shining in the peak of summer.

Farmer Trainees meditate on ripeness in the field

Farmer Trainees meditate on ripeness in the field

Farmer Trainee Journal Entries

Want to see the farm through the eyes of our Farmer Trainees? Read their weekly blog posts below.

This week’s Journal Excerpt comes from Farmer Trainee Haleemah:

As a recent champion against lung cancer (I didn’t just survive it, I beat it), the most revolutionary and proactive thing I can do is drop seeds in the ground, grow my own food, and help others to do the same. You see, my experience at Sarvodaya has proven that farming is not such a departure after all. Farming is an act of social and economic justice. Food is absolutely a quality of life issue. The environment is a quality of life issue. The natural world is under attack and over- commodified, as it is common place to purchase water, seeds, and dirt.

This week’s CSA Box

(Please click each item below for a larger photo, description, and preparation instructions.)

NOTE: We are trying to get around to update vegetables descriptions. In the mean time, for items without a provided description, feel free to Google uses and recipes.

Bread Sample:
We have been searching for months for a local baker who could offer all of our CSA members a whole-grain, sourdough bread that tastes like bread should. Two weeks ago, the baker we were looking for showed up at one of our Coffee, Compost, and Conversation events. Her name is Christina Nelson, and she calls her bakery Demeter Bread and Pastry. Christina is just starting off as a small-scale artisan baker, sourcing her flour from the famous Grist and Toll mill in Pasadena. Grist and Toll offers only organic grains, milled fresh every week, and Christina adds nothing to their flour, except a bit of salt. Her bread is has a beautiful soft texture, with a pleasant sours hints, and a delicious crisp crust. We think you will really enjoy it.

We are going to start off by offering Christina’s Country Loaf, which is a mix of 90% Star Hard Whole Wheat and 10% Triple IV Hard Red Whole Wheat.   The sample we have included in your box is a 1/4 loaf. The whole loaf will be offered at $8.50 per loaf, and will be available on a subscription basis only. We will send further purchase instructions in a separate email.

Vegetables:
– 1 lb New Girl tomatoes
– 1 bunch kale
– 1 bunch amaranth
– 1 bag mixed sweet peppers (the big ones)
– 1 box mixed cherry tomatoes*
– 1 bag eggplant *
– 1 bag okra*
– 1 lb Suyo Long cucumbers*
– 1 bunch water spinach**
– 1 bunch Egyptian green onions**
– 1 rampicante squash**

Herbs:
– 1 bunch basil
– 1 bag jalapenos*

Fruit:
– 1 lb oranges
– 1 box mixed fruit (figs, sweet limes, and/or passion fruit)*

*LARGE VEGGIE BOX ONLY
**SMALL VEGGIE BOX ONLY

Storage Instructions

Leafy Vegetables
In case your greens are wilted by the time you pickup your box, please follow these instructions:

– Fill a small bowl or tub with 1 inch of water
– Cut a 1/2 inch of the bottoms of the stems of your leafy greens
– Place greens, with stems down, into the bowl of water
– Leave the greens in the bowl overnight and by morning they should be rehydrated

Wrap your rehydrated greens in a towel and store the in the fridge. Summer greens like water spinach, moringa, and yam leaves don’t last long either way, so eat those as soon as you can.

Herbs
The best way to store your herbs so that they keep longer is to cut the stems a little and place them in a glass filled with about an inch of water. Cover the leaves loosely with a bag and keep them in the refrigerator. Replace the water inside when it gets cloudy. This works great with basil, mint, cilantro, parsley, and many other herbs.

Please feel free to share your recipes with us and also any storing tips you may have. 🙂

Farm Update

Hello Growing Club Members & CSA members!

This week I have some EXTREMELY exciting news to share with you. We have been working on something in secret for a while now, and didn’t really tell anyone because we didn’t want to jinx it. After many weeks of progress, however, I am ready to share this very, very secret secret with you……

We are buying the farm!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Yes you read that right! I think I have to say it again. We are buying the farm!!!!!!!!!!! After being at our Pomona Farm for almost exactly 2 years now, we have grown very attached to it. The farm has become such a beautiful space that is loved by so many people, that we could not bare to risk it being sold off to a “developer” or used for other such nefarious purposes. Starting on August 8th, we will be the official owners of 1196 S San Antonio Ave, including the 1927 house that sits at the front of the property. I know you are now salivating (as I am) at the possibilities of .63 acres of land being taken care of by such jungle-minded people as myself and The Growing Club’s staff, and I can ensure you we will not let you down. We are already making a variety of plans to turn this property into The Growing Home 17.0, and it is very much a possibility due to all the support you all have given us! From the depths of the forests in our hearts, we all want to thank you for believing in our mission and liking our delicious produce. Our future is surely full of magic, tomatoes, and organic unicorns.

Until next week,

Farmer Rishi
Founder/Director, The Growing Club

Photos of the Week

Cammi packing the cherry tomatoes

Cammi packing the cherry tomatoes

Kelsey showing off our beautiful cabbages.

Kelsey showing off our beautiful cabbages.

Haleemah poses mid-harvest

Haleemah poses mid-harvest

Farmer Trainee Journal Entries

Want to see the farm through the eyes of our Farmer Trainees? Read their weekly blog posts below.

This week’s Journal Excerpt comes from Farmer Trainee Kelsey (I just found these first two lines so funny!):

So anyway!! The C-A-R-N-A-G-E!!

I found myself yellow up to my forearms with aphid guts this week. Many of the okra leaves are literally covered in aphids, and although they have not seemed to damage the plant very much yet, we know it is coming. I saw a handful of lady bugs scattered on the plant as well (they eat aphids), but there are not nearly enough to control this aphid problem so now we are going to make it a habit to wash the okra leaves before we harvest.

This week’s CSA Box

(Please click each item below for a larger photo, description, and preparation instructions.)

NOTE: We are trying to get around to update vegetables descriptions. In the mean time, for items without a provided description, feel free to Google uses and recipes.

Vegetables:
– 1-2 zuchinno rampicante or zuchinni
– 1 bag eggplant*
– 1 bunch moringa (recipes in the link) *
– 1 bag sweet peppers peppers
– 1 lb cherry tomatoes
– 1 lb New Girl tomatoes
– 2-3 Suyo Long cucumbers
– 1 bunch kale*
– 1 bunch Egyptian green onion**

Herbs:
– 1 bunch garlic chives*
– 1 bunch basil

Fruit:
– 1 lb pluots, mixed varieties
– 1 lb oranges*

*LARGE VEGGIE BOX ONLY
**SMALL VEGGIE BOX ONLY

Storage Instructions

Leafy Vegetables
In case your greens are wilted by the time you pickup your box, please follow these instructions:

– Fill a small bowl or tub with 1 inch of water
– Cut a 1/2 inch of the bottoms of the stems of your leafy greens
– Place greens, with stems down, into the bowl of water
– Leave the greens in the bowl overnight and by morning they should be rehydrated

Wrap your rehydrated greens in a towel and store the in the fridge. Summer greens like water spinach, moringa, and yam leaves don’t last long either way, so eat those as soon as you can.

Herbs
The best way to store your herbs so that they keep longer is to cut the stems a little and place them in a glass filled with about an inch of water. Cover the leaves loosely with a bag and keep them in the refrigerator. Replace the water inside when it gets cloudy. This works great with basil, mint, cilantro, parsley, and many other herbs.

Please feel free to share your recipes with us and also any storing tips you may have. 🙂