Category: CSA Box

Farm Update

Hello Growing Club Members & CSA members!

The last few weeks have been quite a whirlwind, but now I can see that the storm is starting to settle. The farmhouse restoration is coming to an end, with just a few projects left to be completed. Our summer class of the Farmer Training Program is now coming to a close, with most of the interns finishing up their required days in the next week or two. This week our new class of Farmer Trainees has begun, and we have another wonderful class of farmers-to-be. This class is another all-female cast, and Cindy, Susan, Krysta, Brooke, and Cecile all started working together on the farm this past Monday. We immediately got their hands in the ground planting new starts, seeding plugs in the nursery, harvesting, turning over beds, and managing the chickens. Their is a lot to learn at the farm, especially now that we have a number of systems in place to keep the farm running smoothly. I’m sure our trainees are up for the task. As for the fields themselves, we are moving further and further into the cool season, with tall, aspirational plants like tomatoes, cucumbers, and beans making their final appearances for the year, and ground-hugging, dew loving plants like broccoli, kale, bok choi, komatsuna, mizuna, and lettuce taking root in their place. With a little luck and some cooperation from the weather spirits, we’ll have a very abundant fall and winter season, just like we did last year. The beauty of fields full of green, happy vegetables in the fall is always a blessing to behold and we’re all looking forward to the weather cooling down after so many months of heat. It will be a great time to visit the farm once this wave of heat passes, so I hope to see many of you who have never been by to the farm sometime soon!

Until next week,

Farmer Rishi
Founder/Director, The Growing Club

Farmer Trainee Journal Entries

Want to see the farm through the eyes of our Farmer Trainees? Read their weekly blog posts below.

Farmer Trainee Journals will be back next week with our new Farmer Training Class!

This week’s CSA Box

(Please click each item below for a larger photo, description, and preparation instructions.)

NOTE: We are trying to get around to update vegetables descriptions. In the mean time, for items without a provided description, feel free to Google uses and recipes.

Vegetables:
– 1 zuchinno rampicante
– 1 bag eggplant
– 1 bunch amaranth
– 1 bunch yard long beans*
– 1 bag green and purple snap beans
– 1 basket sweet peppers + jalapenos*
– 1 bunch yam leaves*
– 1 bunch Egyptian green onions*
– 1 bunch water spinach **
– 1 bunch moringa greens + moringa pods **

Herbs:
– 1 bunch basil
– 1 bundle lemongrass *

Fruit:
– 1 lb mixed stone fruit*
– .5 lb jujube from The Growing Home

*LARGE VEGGIE BOX ONLY
**SMALL VEGGIE BOX ONLY

Storage Instructions

Leafy Vegetables
In case your greens are wilted by the time you pickup your box, please follow these instructions:

– Fill a small bowl or tub with 1 inch of water
– Cut a 1/2 inch of the bottoms of the stems of your leafy greens
– Place greens, with stems down, into the bowl of water
– Leave the greens in the bowl overnight and by morning they should be rehydrated

Wrap your rehydrated greens in a towel and store the in the fridge. Summer greens like water spinach, moringa, and yam leaves don’t last long either way, so eat those as soon as you can.

Herbs
The best way to store your herbs so that they keep longer is to cut the stems a little and place them in a glass filled with about an inch of water. Cover the leaves loosely with a bag and keep them in the refrigerator. Replace the water inside when it gets cloudy. This works great with basil, mint, cilantro, parsley, and many other herbs.

Please feel free to share your recipes with us and also any storing tips you may have. 🙂

Farm Update

Hello Growing Club Members & CSA members!

 

It has been another extremely full week for us at the farm and especially the farmhouse.  We have made tremendous progress with the farmhouse which, with the help and guidance of our friend and Club Member Russ, is looking so beautiful. Russ flew down from Seattle and has been staying with us the last three weeks to help whip this house into shape, and he has done an incredible job of transforming it into a warm home for us. We are so grateful for his willingness to bring forth this dream with us.  As for the farm, it is chugging along even with our attention diverted mostly to the home. The weather is transitioning us to more fall crops, which means lots of greens and root vegetables. We are excited for the rest of the cooler temperatures, as we are weary of the heat the constant work of summer at the farm. Hope you all are enjoying your week and will enjoy this week’s bounty.

Until next week,

Farmer Rishi
Founder/Director, The Growing Club

Farmer Trainee Journal Entries

Want to see the farm through the eyes of our Farmer Trainees? Read their weekly blog posts below.

 

This week’s CSA Box

(Please click each item below for a larger photo, description, and preparation instructions.)

NOTE: We are trying to get around to update vegetables descriptions. In the mean time, for items without a provided description, feel free to Google uses and recipes.

Vegetables:
– 1 zuchinno rampicante
– 1 bag nopales (cactus pads)*
– 1 bag long sweet peppers + a few jalapenos*
– 2-3 eggplant*
– 1 bunch yam leaf
– 1 bunch sorrel*
– 1 bunch yard long beans
– 1 bunch water spinach*
– 1 bunch moringa **
– 1 bag bell peppers **
– 1 bunch amaranth**

Herbs:
– 1 bunch mint*
– 1 bunch basil

Fruit:
– 1 lb mixed stone fruit
– 1 lb Growing Home mango*

*LARGE VEGGIE BOX ONLY
**SMALL VEGGIE BOX ONLY

Storage Instructions

Leafy Vegetables
In case your greens are wilted by the time you pickup your box, please follow these instructions:

– Fill a small bowl or tub with 1 inch of water
– Cut a 1/2 inch of the bottoms of the stems of your leafy greens
– Place greens, with stems down, into the bowl of water
– Leave the greens in the bowl overnight and by morning they should be rehydrated

Wrap your rehydrated greens in a towel and store the in the fridge. Summer greens like water spinach, moringa, and yam leaves don’t last long either way, so eat those as soon as you can.

Herbs
The best way to store your herbs so that they keep longer is to cut the stems a little and place them in a glass filled with about an inch of water. Cover the leaves loosely with a bag and keep them in the refrigerator. Replace the water inside when it gets cloudy. This works great with basil, mint, cilantro, parsley, and many other herbs.

Please feel free to share your recipes with us and also any storing tips you may have. 🙂

Farm Update

Hello Growing Club Members & CSA members!

As you have probably noticed, I have been unable to get these weekly posts out to you for the past three weeks. We have been so busy working on the remodeling of the farmhouse that I’ve had to let a few of my obligations slide. This weeks’ post will be brief as well. I plan to return to writing these weekly updates once the renovation is complete and I have the time to do them. I hope you are all still enjoying our produce and we thank you for your continued support.

An additional note: We have reached the point of the year which I call the “famine season.” After so many months of summer, the soil is tired, the plants are tired, and we are tired. You may notice your box of produce is a little lighter in the next few weeks as the famine season peaks. You can expect boxes to return to a hefty size once the weather cools a bit and we can move into our fall and winter vegetable crops.

Until next week,

Farmer Rishi
Founder/Director, The Growing Club

Farmer Trainee Journal Entries

Want to see the farm through the eyes of our Farmer Trainees? Read their weekly blog posts below.

This week’s Journal Excerpt comes from Farmer Trainee Haleemah:

As a recent champion against lung cancer (I didn’t just survive it, I beat it), the most revolutionary and proactive thing I can do is drop seeds in the ground, grow my own food, and help others to do the same. You see, my experience at Sarvodaya has proven that farming is not such a departure after all. Farming is an act of social and economic justice. Food is absolutely a quality of life issue. The environment is a quality of life issue. The natural world is under attack and over- commodified, as it is common place to purchase water, seeds, and dirt.

This week’s CSA Box

(Please click each item below for a larger photo, description, and preparation instructions.)

NOTE: We are trying to get around to update vegetables descriptions. In the mean time, for items without a provided description, feel free to Google uses and recipes.

Vegetables:
– 1 rampicante squash
– 1 bunch yam leaves
– 1 bunch amaranth
– 1 bunch moringa greens and moringa pods*
– 1 bag mixed sweet peppers
– 1 bag eggplant
– 1 bag organic mixed salad greens ** (from Sage Mountain Farm)

Herbs:
– 1 bunch garlic chives
– 1 bunch garlic chive flowers
– 1 bunch italian basil*

Fruit:
– 1 lb mixed stone fruit
– 1 bag of jujubes and a Growing Home mango *

*LARGE VEGGIE BOX ONLY
**SMALL VEGGIE BOX ONLY

Storage Instructions

Leafy Vegetables
In case your greens are wilted by the time you pickup your box, please follow these instructions:

– Fill a small bowl or tub with 1 inch of water
– Cut a 1/2 inch of the bottoms of the stems of your leafy greens
– Place greens, with stems down, into the bowl of water
– Leave the greens in the bowl overnight and by morning they should be rehydrated

Wrap your rehydrated greens in a towel and store the in the fridge. Summer greens like water spinach, moringa, and yam leaves don’t last long either way, so eat those as soon as you can.

Herbs
The best way to store your herbs so that they keep longer is to cut the stems a little and place them in a glass filled with about an inch of water. Cover the leaves loosely with a bag and keep them in the refrigerator. Replace the water inside when it gets cloudy. This works great with basil, mint, cilantro, parsley, and many other herbs.

Please feel free to share your recipes with us and also any storing tips you may have. 🙂

Farm Update

Hello Growing Club Members & CSA members!

Last Friday, I walked the fields to see which beds still need to be planted and which beds weren’t doing well. For the first time in two years, I came back to the front of the farm with a very meager task list for our Farmer Trainees. To be sure, there was plenty of work we could do, but this was the first time every bed was absolutely full, with beautiful growth coming from almost every inch of our beds. That feeling of satisfaction was immense, not just because it meant that the farm is full of healthy food for our community, but also because it meant that our Farmer Trainees were really getting the hang of this whole farming gig.  Our current trainee class is now coming into their 3rd month, and many of them are showing promise as urban farm extraordinaires.  Now that we will have free reign to do the farm up to its full potential, its exciting to think about the future possibilities of this little farm that could and I can barely hold that excitement in.

P.S. WE ARE GOING TO PLANT SOOOOOO MANY FRUIT TREES! OMGAWSH DELICIOUSNESS!

Until next week,

Farmer Rishi
Founder/Director, The Growing Club

Photos of the Week

Chickens enjoying fresh water and water hyacinth from our mini pond.

Chickens enjoying fresh water and water hyacinth from our mini pond.

Our farm shining in the peak of summer.

Our farm shining in the peak of summer.

Farmer Trainees meditate on ripeness in the field

Farmer Trainees meditate on ripeness in the field

Farmer Trainee Journal Entries

Want to see the farm through the eyes of our Farmer Trainees? Read their weekly blog posts below.

This week’s Journal Excerpt comes from Farmer Trainee Haleemah:

As a recent champion against lung cancer (I didn’t just survive it, I beat it), the most revolutionary and proactive thing I can do is drop seeds in the ground, grow my own food, and help others to do the same. You see, my experience at Sarvodaya has proven that farming is not such a departure after all. Farming is an act of social and economic justice. Food is absolutely a quality of life issue. The environment is a quality of life issue. The natural world is under attack and over- commodified, as it is common place to purchase water, seeds, and dirt.

This week’s CSA Box

(Please click each item below for a larger photo, description, and preparation instructions.)

NOTE: We are trying to get around to update vegetables descriptions. In the mean time, for items without a provided description, feel free to Google uses and recipes.

Bread Sample:
We have been searching for months for a local baker who could offer all of our CSA members a whole-grain, sourdough bread that tastes like bread should. Two weeks ago, the baker we were looking for showed up at one of our Coffee, Compost, and Conversation events. Her name is Christina Nelson, and she calls her bakery Demeter Bread and Pastry. Christina is just starting off as a small-scale artisan baker, sourcing her flour from the famous Grist and Toll mill in Pasadena. Grist and Toll offers only organic grains, milled fresh every week, and Christina adds nothing to their flour, except a bit of salt. Her bread is has a beautiful soft texture, with a pleasant sours hints, and a delicious crisp crust. We think you will really enjoy it.

We are going to start off by offering Christina’s Country Loaf, which is a mix of 90% Star Hard Whole Wheat and 10% Triple IV Hard Red Whole Wheat.   The sample we have included in your box is a 1/4 loaf. The whole loaf will be offered at $8.50 per loaf, and will be available on a subscription basis only. We will send further purchase instructions in a separate email.

Vegetables:
– 1 lb New Girl tomatoes
– 1 bunch kale
– 1 bunch amaranth
– 1 bag mixed sweet peppers (the big ones)
– 1 box mixed cherry tomatoes*
– 1 bag eggplant *
– 1 bag okra*
– 1 lb Suyo Long cucumbers*
– 1 bunch water spinach**
– 1 bunch Egyptian green onions**
– 1 rampicante squash**

Herbs:
– 1 bunch basil
– 1 bag jalapenos*

Fruit:
– 1 lb oranges
– 1 box mixed fruit (figs, sweet limes, and/or passion fruit)*

*LARGE VEGGIE BOX ONLY
**SMALL VEGGIE BOX ONLY

Storage Instructions

Leafy Vegetables
In case your greens are wilted by the time you pickup your box, please follow these instructions:

– Fill a small bowl or tub with 1 inch of water
– Cut a 1/2 inch of the bottoms of the stems of your leafy greens
– Place greens, with stems down, into the bowl of water
– Leave the greens in the bowl overnight and by morning they should be rehydrated

Wrap your rehydrated greens in a towel and store the in the fridge. Summer greens like water spinach, moringa, and yam leaves don’t last long either way, so eat those as soon as you can.

Herbs
The best way to store your herbs so that they keep longer is to cut the stems a little and place them in a glass filled with about an inch of water. Cover the leaves loosely with a bag and keep them in the refrigerator. Replace the water inside when it gets cloudy. This works great with basil, mint, cilantro, parsley, and many other herbs.

Please feel free to share your recipes with us and also any storing tips you may have. 🙂

Farm Update

Hello Growing Club Members & CSA members!

This week I have some EXTREMELY exciting news to share with you. We have been working on something in secret for a while now, and didn’t really tell anyone because we didn’t want to jinx it. After many weeks of progress, however, I am ready to share this very, very secret secret with you……

We are buying the farm!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Yes you read that right! I think I have to say it again. We are buying the farm!!!!!!!!!!! After being at our Pomona Farm for almost exactly 2 years now, we have grown very attached to it. The farm has become such a beautiful space that is loved by so many people, that we could not bare to risk it being sold off to a “developer” or used for other such nefarious purposes. Starting on August 8th, we will be the official owners of 1196 S San Antonio Ave, including the 1927 house that sits at the front of the property. I know you are now salivating (as I am) at the possibilities of .63 acres of land being taken care of by such jungle-minded people as myself and The Growing Club’s staff, and I can ensure you we will not let you down. We are already making a variety of plans to turn this property into The Growing Home 17.0, and it is very much a possibility due to all the support you all have given us! From the depths of the forests in our hearts, we all want to thank you for believing in our mission and liking our delicious produce. Our future is surely full of magic, tomatoes, and organic unicorns.

Until next week,

Farmer Rishi
Founder/Director, The Growing Club

Photos of the Week

Cammi packing the cherry tomatoes

Cammi packing the cherry tomatoes

Kelsey showing off our beautiful cabbages.

Kelsey showing off our beautiful cabbages.

Haleemah poses mid-harvest

Haleemah poses mid-harvest

Farmer Trainee Journal Entries

Want to see the farm through the eyes of our Farmer Trainees? Read their weekly blog posts below.

This week’s Journal Excerpt comes from Farmer Trainee Kelsey (I just found these first two lines so funny!):

So anyway!! The C-A-R-N-A-G-E!!

I found myself yellow up to my forearms with aphid guts this week. Many of the okra leaves are literally covered in aphids, and although they have not seemed to damage the plant very much yet, we know it is coming. I saw a handful of lady bugs scattered on the plant as well (they eat aphids), but there are not nearly enough to control this aphid problem so now we are going to make it a habit to wash the okra leaves before we harvest.

This week’s CSA Box

(Please click each item below for a larger photo, description, and preparation instructions.)

NOTE: We are trying to get around to update vegetables descriptions. In the mean time, for items without a provided description, feel free to Google uses and recipes.

Vegetables:
– 1-2 zuchinno rampicante or zuchinni
– 1 bag eggplant*
– 1 bunch moringa (recipes in the link) *
– 1 bag sweet peppers peppers
– 1 lb cherry tomatoes
– 1 lb New Girl tomatoes
– 2-3 Suyo Long cucumbers
– 1 bunch kale*
– 1 bunch Egyptian green onion**

Herbs:
– 1 bunch garlic chives*
– 1 bunch basil

Fruit:
– 1 lb pluots, mixed varieties
– 1 lb oranges*

*LARGE VEGGIE BOX ONLY
**SMALL VEGGIE BOX ONLY

Storage Instructions

Leafy Vegetables
In case your greens are wilted by the time you pickup your box, please follow these instructions:

– Fill a small bowl or tub with 1 inch of water
– Cut a 1/2 inch of the bottoms of the stems of your leafy greens
– Place greens, with stems down, into the bowl of water
– Leave the greens in the bowl overnight and by morning they should be rehydrated

Wrap your rehydrated greens in a towel and store the in the fridge. Summer greens like water spinach, moringa, and yam leaves don’t last long either way, so eat those as soon as you can.

Herbs
The best way to store your herbs so that they keep longer is to cut the stems a little and place them in a glass filled with about an inch of water. Cover the leaves loosely with a bag and keep them in the refrigerator. Replace the water inside when it gets cloudy. This works great with basil, mint, cilantro, parsley, and many other herbs.

Please feel free to share your recipes with us and also any storing tips you may have. 🙂

Farm Update

Hello Growing Club Members & CSA members!

Another week passes by at our beautiful farms here in the Pomona Valley. Our main farm in Pomona is growing beautifully, with many of our plants reaching up high into the sky on our new trellis systems and making the farm look like a beautiful jungle of food.  We are harvesting record quantities of produce and being in the farm surrounded by our native sunflowers is truly a blessing. On Monday, I went to visit The Growing Commons to check in on the new garden. The Commons is growing beautifully as well, as all of the trees have put on deep green foliage (some figs have event started to fruit) and the CA native understory has begun flowering. One of our Farmer Trainees, Tyler, told me last week he has been stopping at the Commons every week to have breakfast before he comes to the farm, and I was so(ooooo) happy to hear that. These gardens are for everyone to enjoy and I’m so grateful that people are finding time to be with them. At home, the most exciting news from The Growing Home is that our Dragonfruit plants are finally putting on a decent fruit set. I’ve counted 18 flowers and buds so far, and I’m holding out for more! I doubt the dragonfruit will make it into the CSA this year though, as they will most likely end up in my belly. If you can hold out for next year, I may reconsider at that time. Ha!

Until next week,

Farmer Rishi
Founder/Director, The Growing Club

Photos of the Week

This week I thought I’d share some photos of the gardens at The Growing Home. Though the spotlight has moved away from our original ecological garden, it remains a dynamic and beautiful space that we are so happy to call home.

Mama papaya tree sprouts a new branch already loaded with fruit.

Mama papaya tree sprouts a new branch already loaded with fruit.

The backyard veggie jungle. Currently harvesting tomatoes, peppers, pumpkins, cucumber.

The backyard veggie jungle. Currently harvesting tomatoes, peppers, pumpkins, cucumber.

Dragonfruit about to bloom! We're so excited.

Dragonfruit about to bloom! We’re so excited.

Farmer Trainee Journal Entries

Want to see the farm through the eyes of our Farmer Trainees? Read their weekly blog posts below.

This week’s Journal Excerpt comes from Farmer Trainee Haleemah:

Whether prepping beds, planting, or harvesting, you are actively participating in the building of something that will feed and fuel people. Similar to childbirth (without the pain of course), I liken farming to co-creation.  Sowing seeds is literally about bringing something into being that does not currently exist.

This week’s CSA Box

(Please click each item below for a larger photo, description, and preparation instructions.)

NOTE: We are trying to get around to update vegetables descriptions. In the mean time, for items without a provided description, feel free to Google uses and recipes.

Vegetables:
– 1-2 zuchinno rampicante*
– 1 bag eggplant*
– 2 zucchini
– 1 bunch moringa (recipes in the link)
– 1 bunch water spinach OR yam leaves
– 1 basket mini bell peppers
– 1 basket cherry tomatoes
– 1 lb New Girl tomatoes

Herbs:
– 1 bunch garlic chives*
– 1 bunch Egyptian green onion

Fruit:
– 1 basket grapes*
– 1 lb oranges

*LARGE VEGGIE BOX ONLY
**SMALL VEGGIE BOX ONLY

Storage Instructions

Leafy Vegetables
In case your greens are wilted by the time you pickup your box, please follow these instructions:

– Fill a small bowl or tub with 1 inch of water
– Cut a 1/2 inch of the bottoms of the stems of your leafy greens
– Place greens, with stems down, into the bowl of water
– Leave the greens in the bowl overnight and by morning they should be rehydrated

Wrap your rehydrated greens in a towel and store the in the fridge. Summer greens like water spinach, moringa, and yam leaves don’t last long either way, so eat those as soon as you can.

Herbs
The best way to store your herbs so that they keep longer is to cut the stems a little and place them in a glass filled with about an inch of water. Cover the leaves loosely with a bag and keep them in the refrigerator. Replace the water inside when it gets cloudy. This works great with basil, mint, cilantro, parsley, and many other herbs.

Please feel free to share your recipes with us and also any storing tips you may have. 🙂

Farm Update

Hello Growing Club Members & CSA members!

Last Friday, The Growing Club held its first official Farmer Training Graduation party, which I entitled “Pitchforks, Poop, and People.” The farm has kept us very busy the last few weeks, so we didn’t have much time to prepare for the party, but we were so happy with how it went. Our graduating Farmer Trainees (Alex, Noy, JD, Karin, and Mona) were really a special group that bonded tightly over the course of their 4 months together and shared many special experiences. We were so touched by their many kinds words towards our community and towards each other, and so happy that they all found their time on the farm to be transformative and educational. We can only hope to have many more classes of Farmer Trainees like this one. We were also able to honor two of our past trainees, Katie and Lynn, who are now so instrumental to the work that we do. The event was topped off with delicious food brought by the members for the potluck and a beautiful night in the garden of The Growing Home. To our graduated trainees: My best wishes to you in your future endeavors. You all have shown yourselves to be thoughtful and caring people, and the world needs your skills and your hearts today more than ever.

Until next week,

Farmer Rishi
Founder/Director, The Growing Club

Photos of the Week

This week I thought I’d share some photos of the gardens at The Growing Home. Though the spotlight has moved away from our original ecological garden, it remains a dynamic and beautiful space that we are so happy to call home.

The Growing Club gathers for the Farmer Training Graduation.

The Growing Club gathers for the Farmer Training Graduation.

Rishi leads a tour at the last Coffee Compost.

Rishi leads a tour at the last Coffee Compost.

Compost Therapy session at Saturday's Coffee Compost and Conversation

Compost Therapy session at Saturday’s Coffee Compost and Conversation

Farmer Trainee Journal Entries

Want to see the farm through the eyes of our Farmer Trainees? Read their weekly blog posts below.

 

This week’s CSA Box

(Please click each item below for a larger photo, description, and preparation instructions.)

NOTE: We are trying to get around to update vegetables descriptions. In the mean time, for items without a provided description, feel free to Google uses and recipes.

Vegetables:
– 1 zuchinno rampicante*
– 1 bunch amaranth
– 1 bunch mixed kale*
– 1 bunch water spinach**
– 1 bunch spring onion*
– 1 bunch peppers
– 1 basket cherry tomatoes
– 1 lb New Girl tomaotes
– 1 heirloom tomato
– 1 bunch moringa*
– 2-3 lemon cucumbers

Herbs:
– 1 bunch italian basil
– 1 bundle lemongrass*

Fruit:
– 1 basket grapes
– 1 lb oranges*

*LARGE VEGGIE BOX ONLY
**SMALL VEGGIE BOX ONLY

Storage Instructions

Leafy Vegetables
In case your greens are wilted by the time you pickup your box, please follow these instructions:

– Fill a small bowl or tub with 1 inch of water
– Cut a 1/2 inch of the bottoms of the stems of your leafy greens
– Place greens, with stems down, into the bowl of water
– Leave the greens in the bowl overnight and by morning they should be rehydrated

Wrap your rehydrated greens in a towel and store the in the fridge. Summer greens like water spinach, moringa, and yam leaves don’t last long either way, so eat those as soon as you can.

Herbs
The best way to store your herbs so that they keep longer is to cut the stems a little and place them in a glass filled with about an inch of water. Cover the leaves loosely with a bag and keep them in the refrigerator. Replace the water inside when it gets cloudy. This works great with basil, mint, cilantro, parsley, and many other herbs.

Please feel free to share your recipes with us and also any storing tips you may have. 🙂

Farm Update

Hello Growing Club Members & CSA members!

I hope you all are enjoying the beautiful tomatoes that have been coming off the farm the last few weeks! We are getting overloaded with tomatoes every day we harvest, and I’m so glad we have wonderful customers who can appreciate (and cook!) these lovely fruits. We have also been smothered with zucchini, which I know you all have probably noticed. This week, we had so many from our one bed that we were able to fill all your boxes up and donate around 30 lbs of zucchini and crookneck squash to our food pantry partner in West Covina. It’s so warming so know that people who appreciate and need our food are getting it, and I can’t express how happy I am to be part of this farm that is “growing” so much change in our community. This week we were visited by the Mayor of Pomona, who stopped by to pick up some tomatoes and squash for his family. He is an avid gardener himself, and I was very happy to give him a tour of our little project. Hopefully he is inspired to help the city start more gardens and farms around the city. Here’s to hoping for (and building) a more ecological and community oriented future!

Until next week,

Farmer Rishi
Founder/Director, The Growing Club

Photos of the Week

This week’s guest photographer was the most lovely Arthi. She took some very artistic photos.

00Irrigation with Farmer Trainee Faye

00Irrigation with Farmer Trainee Faye

Lynn walks the verdant fields.

Lynn walks the verdant fields.

Laura watches over the chickens like a caring mother.

Laura watches over the chickens like a caring mother.

Farmer Trainee Journal Entries

Want to see the farm through the eyes of our Farmer Trainees? Read their weekly blog posts below.

This week’s Farmer’s Journal highlight comes to us from Farmer Trainee Laura:

When we are about our chores, there is always time for conversation – sometimes personal – other times just how we are managing to survive the heat. I cannot explain adequately the sense of community at the farm – something I have never experienced before. (It is so much different than the office environment I am used to.) We all work together on the farm and I look forward to learning more about the person I am working with. Some days I will work with Haleemah, others days with Faye and the next with Rishi. But we all have a common goal at the farm and we get er done.

This week’s CSA Box

(Please click each item below for a larger photo, description, and preparation instructions.)

NOTE: We are trying to get around to update vegetables descriptions. In the mean time, for items without a provided description, feel free to Google uses and recipes.

Vegetables:
– 1 zuchinno rampicante
– 2-3 summer squashes, mixed varieties
– 1 bag green and purple beans*
– 1 bunch spring onion*
– 2 cucumbers, mixed varieties
– 1 basket cherry tomatoes
– 2-3 New Girl tomatoes
– 3-4 cucumbers, mixed varieties

Green Vegetables:
– 1 bunch water spinach**
– 1 bunch moringa*
– 1 bunch mixed kale

Herbs:
– 1 bunch italian basil
– 1 bunch garlic chives*

Fruit:
– 1 bag green plums

*LARGE VEGGIE BOX ONLY
**SMALL VEGGIE BOX ONLY

Storage Instructions

Leafy Vegetables
In case your greens are wilted by the time you pickup your box, please follow these instructions:

– Fill a small bowl or tub with 1 inch of water
– Cut a 1/2 inch of the bottoms of the stems of your leafy greens
– Place greens, with stems down, into the bowl of water
– Leave the greens in the bowl overnight and by morning they should be rehydrated

Wrap your rehydrated greens in a towel and store the in the fridge. Summer greens like water spinach, moringa, and yam leaves don’t last long either way, so eat those as soon as you can.

Herbs
The best way to store your herbs so that they keep longer is to cut the stems a little and place them in a glass filled with about an inch of water. Cover the leaves loosely with a bag and keep them in the refrigerator. Replace the water inside when it gets cloudy. This works great with basil, mint, cilantro, parsley, and many other herbs.

Please feel free to share your recipes with us and also any storing tips you may have. 🙂

Farm Update

Hello Growing Club Members & CSA members!

This week has been a busy one for me, since I have been taking care of a few big projects that have taken my attention away from the farm. These projects have made my life a little too hectic over the past few weeks, but there was a wonderful silver lining to be found. With my attention away from the farm and my mom out of the country, Katie and Lynn have had to take over much of the farm’s management and they have been doing a beautiful job of it. When we started this farm just under 2 years ago, we had a dream to create a space where people could come together and care for the soil, for our community, and for our earth family. Katie and Lynn have become embodiment’s of this goal, and it is deeply warming to see how they have grown into their roles on the farm. I’m so glad they found us and our farm and have integrated so well into our community as leaders and friends. I hope that this farm can be a space for growth and learning for many more in the years to come, as it has been for all of us that have worked it’s soil.

Until next week,

Farmer Rishi
Founder/Director, The Growing Club

Photos of the Week

This week I’m highlighting some photos taken by Farmer Trainees! Read their blog posts to get the full scoop.

The beautiful purple beans come from beautiful purple flowers.

The beautiful purple beans come from beautiful purple flowers.

Happy Tyler holding the first tomatoes of the season.

Happy Tyler holding the first tomatoes of the season.

Kelsey unloads the last of the fruit harvested from our orchard.

Kelsey unloads the last of the fruit harvested from our orchard.

Farmer Trainee Journal Entries

Want to see the farm through the eyes of our Farmer Trainees? Read their weekly blog posts below.

This week’s Farmer’s Journal highlight comes to us from Farmer Trainee Cami:

It’s very rewarding to see the web of interconnection between everything on the farm. This is what drew me to the farm in the first place. Regenerative practices, only a handful of people ever use this term. When I mention to anyone that I have a masters degree in regenerative studies they are really impressed, mostly because they think it means I’m a doctor who regrows limbs, which is not the case at all. Regenerative practices let things come full circle and close the loop verses other linear systems.

This week’s CSA Box

(Please click each item below for a larger photo, description, and preparation instructions.)

NOTE: We are trying to get around to update vegetables descriptions. In the mean time, for items without a provided description, feel free to Google uses and recipes.

Vegetables:
– 1 zuchinno rampicante
– 2-3 summer squashes, mixed varieties*
– 1 box green and purple beans
– 1 head kohlrabi *
– 1 bunch spring onion*
– 2 cucumbers, mixed varieties
– 1 box cherry tomatoes
– 3-4 cucumbers, mixed varieties

Green Vegetables:
– 1 bunch water spinach
– 1 bunch mixed kale

Herbs:
– 1 bunch italian basil
– 1 bunch parsley*

Fruit:
– 1 bag nectarines
– 1 bag peaches*

*LARGE VEGGIE BOX ONLY
**SMALL VEGGIE BOX ONLY

Storage Instructions

Leafy Vegetables
In case your greens are wilted by the time you pickup your box, please follow these instructions:

– Fill a small bowl or tub with 1 inch of water
– Cut a 1/2 inch of the bottoms of the stems of your leafy greens
– Place greens, with stems down, into the bowl of water
– Leave the greens in the bowl overnight and by morning they should be rehydrated

Wrap your rehydrated greens in a towel and store the in the fridge. Summer greens like water spinach, moringa, and yam leaves don’t last long either way, so eat those as soon as you can.

Herbs
The best way to store your herbs so that they keep longer is to cut the stems a little and place them in a glass filled with about an inch of water. Cover the leaves loosely with a bag and keep them in the refrigerator. Replace the water inside when it gets cloudy. This works great with basil, mint, cilantro, parsley, and many other herbs.

Please feel free to share your recipes with us and also any storing tips you may have. 🙂

Farm Update

Hello Growing Club Members & CSA members!

What a scorching week it has been out here on the farm. It was already near the 90’s when we arrived to work on Monday morning, and I had worried all weekend about how the heat was going to affect the plants, the chickens and us. I warned the new Farmer Trainee class when they first arrived that they had enrolled in the hardest farming season, and Monday sure proved it. The plants were wilt-y, the chickens were panting, and boy were we sweating. Still, we were able to make it through the day by getting all the necessary field work done early (picking, planting, chicken care), and were able to come into the shade for the remainder of the morning to clean new CSA bins and paint a few decorative signs. Amazingly, when we returned this morning to harvest the CSA, we found absolutely ZERO signs of heat burn in the plants themselves, although some fruits on the peppers and tomatoes got sun scald. It was a true testament week to the power of really, really healthy soil and good water management. The trainees did another kick-butt job this week, and the farm is looking so gorgeous since it is fully planted out and growing like crazy. This month will be are more productive ever, we have already harvested 1337 pounds of food!

Until next week,

Farmer Rishi
Founder/Director, The Growing Club

Photos of the Week

This week I’m highlighting some photos taken by Farmer Trainees! Read their blog posts to get the full scoop.

A crazy looking rampicante squash. They are so happy this year and we are overloaded!

A crazy looking rampicante squash. They are so happy this year and we are overloaded!

We lost a number of nectarines this season to this grey mold. It seems to have been caused by all the summer moisture.

We lost a number of nectarines this season to this grey mold. It seems to have been caused by all the summer moisture.

One of the tomato forests. We should be flooded with them soon now that the heat has come.

One of the tomato forests. We should be flooded with them soon now that the heat has come.

Farmer Trainee Journal Entries

Want to see the farm through the eyes of our Farmer Trainees? Read their weekly blog posts below.

This week’s Farmer’s Journal highlight comes to us from Farmer Trainee Faye:

Our conversation made me reflect on how the farm acts as a microcosm of the human life cycle – seeds and seedlings are set to grow in the nursery, young plants are transplanted into the field, plants are trained to grow a certain way, they are pruned of all that prevents good growth, they reproduce, and when they die, they go to the compost pile. But I guess death isn’t that final, because as seen with compost, death is just another form of life; it gives way for deeper, richer life to others. What a beautiful paradoxical truth!

This week’s CSA Box

(Please click each item below for a larger photo, description, and preparation instructions.)

NOTE: We are trying to get around to update vegetables descriptions. In the mean time, for items without a provided description, feel free to Google uses and recipes.

Vegetables:
– 1 zuchinno rampicante
– 1-2 summer squashes, mixed varieties
– 1 box green and purple beans *
– 1 head kohlrabi
– 1 bunch spring onion*
– 2 cucumbers, mixed varieties
– 1 box cherry tomatoes and peppers **

Green Vegetables:
– 1 bunch water spinach*
– 1 bunch mixed kale

Herbs:
– 1 bunch garlic chives*
– 1 bunch italian basil

Fruit:
– 1 bag plums
– 1 bag apricots*

*LARGE VEGGIE BOX ONLY
**SMALL VEGGIE BOX ONLY

Storage Instructions

Leafy Vegetables
In case your greens are wilted by the time you pickup your box, please follow these instructions:

– Fill a small bowl or tub with 1 inch of water
– Cut a 1/2 inch of the bottoms of the stems of your leafy greens
– Place greens, with stems down, into the bowl of water
– Leave the greens in the bowl overnight and by morning they should be rehydrated

Wrap your rehydrated greens in a towel and store the in the fridge. Summer greens like water spinach, moringa, and yam leaves don’t last long either way, so eat those as soon as you can.

Herbs
The best way to store your herbs so that they keep longer is to cut the stems a little and place them in a glass filled with about an inch of water. Cover the leaves loosely with a bag and keep them in the refrigerator. Replace the water inside when it gets cloudy. This works great with basil, mint, cilantro, parsley, and many other herbs.

Please feel free to share your recipes with us and also any storing tips you may have. 🙂